An overview of the most famous TRES tea cultivars from Taiwan

An overview of the most famous TRES tea cultivars from Taiwan

Taiwan Tea Research and Extention Station LogoTaiwan Tea Research and Extension Station (TRES), formerly known as Taiwan Tea Experiment Station (TTES), is a well-respected Taiwanese government organization among farmers. This supports the tea farmers in their work with the development of modern processing technology and offers, among other things, further training opportunities with the aim of increasing yields but at the same time improving environmental protection.


With the support of TRES, Taiwanese tea has established itself as a high-quality product worldwide. This is partly due to the fact that the government is promoting the protection of the island's unique flora, fauna and fauna, thereby severely restricting the area of the valuable mountain areas for tea plantations. Instead of flooding the world market with cheap, mass-produced products, tea farmers are instead relying on high quality tea to be produced in smaller quantities. This helps maintain the independence and livelihoods of thousands of smallholders and affiliates.

Taiwan Tea Research and Extension Station Since 1969, it has been working very hard to further improve the tea cultivars used. New crosses are being researched in trial cultivation and, depending on their success, these are then grown in the tea gardens.

 This table shows a summary of all teas developed by TRES.

 

TRES / TTES # Surname    Type  remarks Year
1     Black cross between Assamica from Nepal (Kyang) and Qing Xin Da-Pan 1969
2     Black cross between Assamica from India (Jaipuri) and Da Yeh Oolong (Big leaf Oolong) 1969
3 Black  cross between Assamica from India (Manipuri) and Hong Xin Da Mao 1969
4     Black cross between Assamica from India (Manipuri) and Hong Xin Da-Pan 1969
5 Oolong wild Hybrid from Fuzhou (China) 1973
6     Oolong wild Hybrid of Qing Xin (Taiwan) 1973
7 Black Big Leaf Varetial from Thailand. Propably Da Mao (Pu-Erh tree) 1973
8     Black Assamica Varetial from India Jaipuri 1973
9 Black cross between Assamica from Kyang (Nepal) and Hong Xin Da-Pan 1975
10     Black cross between Assamica from India (Jaipuri) and Huang Gan 1975
11 Black cross between Assamica from India (Jaipuri) and Da Yeh Oolong (Big leaf Oolong) 1975
12 Jin Xuan 金 萱 Oolong cross between Ying Zhi Hong Xin and TRES # 8 1981
13 Cuy Yu 翠玉 Oolong cross between Ying Zhi Hong Xin and TRES # 80 (Tainon-80) 1981
14 Bai Wen 白文 Oolong cross between Bair Mau Hour and TTES # 983 (Hwang-Gan x Kyang) 1983
15 Bai Yian 白燕 Oolong cross between Bai Mao Hou and TTES # 983 (Hwang-Gan x Kyang) 1983
16 Bai He 白鶴 Oolong cross between TTES # 1958 and TTES # 335 (Tainon-355) (Dah-Yeh-Oolong x Kyang) 1983
17 Ruan Zhi 白鷺 Oolong cross between TTES # 1958 and TTES # 335 (Tainon-355) (Dah-Yeh-Oolong x Kyang) 1983
18 Hong Yu / Ruby18 紅玉 Black cross between Taiwanese wild Tea tree (B-607) and Burmese assamica (B729) 1999
19 Bi Yu / Green Jade 碧玉 Oolong cross between TTES # 12 and Qing Xin Oolong 2004
20 Ying Xiang 迎 香 Oolong cross between 2022 (Da-Yeh Oolong x Tanion-20) and Qing Xin Oolong 2004
21 Hong Yun 紅韻 Black cross between Keemun and Nepalese assamica from Kyang (FKK-1 line) 2008
22 unknown   Oolong cross between Qing Xin Oolong and Jin Xuan 2014

 

Feature picture:

picture of yonghan kim on Pixabay